Posts Tagged ‘this collection’

OPENING NIGHT: this collection at The Glue Factory

Wednesday, April 13th, 2011

Glue Factory

Come and join Edinburgh-based community arts project this collection as we make our first ever journey west and open an exciting fortnight-long event at Glasgow’s infamous Glue Factory artspace!

THIS COLLECTION AT THE GLUE FACTORY: OPENING NIGHT
At: The Glue Factory, 22 Farnell Street, Glasgow, G4 9SE
Starts: 7.30pm
Finishes: 1.00am

HEADLINING:

+ BLOCHESTRA: innovative and experimental noise-makers — “a band to turn the conventional music experience on its head.”

+ ZORRAS: poetry-music-video weirdness fusion. With megaphones.

+ DJ SET/SPECIAL GUESTS TBC: tunes inspired by this collection poems

ALSO ON SHOW:

+ breathtaking images from renowned graphic designer Ming Tse

+ a huge and stunning mural by illustrators Helen Askew and Laura Mossop

+ this collection’s ‘top 100 poems’ and the plethora of creative, collborative responses they have inspired so far

REFRESHMENTS:

Honeymede will be on hand to supply their delicious home-brew ale at a mere £1 per pint!

TBC: this collection hope to provide a minibus to ferry faithful Edinburgh followers over to the event and back from Glasgow afterwards. Seats on the FilmPoetry Magic Schoolbus will cost a mere £3 and be allocated on a first-come-first-served basis. The bus is not yet 100% confirmed but if you think you would like a ride to the event, drop a line to film@thiscollection.org to register your interest.

ANY QUESTIONS? FILM@THISCOLLECTION.ORG
Click “attending” on our Facebook event!

WHAT IS THIS COLLECTION…?

this collection began life as a modest bouquet of 100 short poems on the subject of Edinburgh. Authors included all manner of Edinburgh residents from high school kids to University professors, and over the course of the past two years, their work has acted as a foundation upon which artists and creatives from all walks of life have built collaborative responses to the poems. Thus far, the project has primarily attracted short films, but more recently the artistic responses have included works as diverse as street art installations, handmade zines and improvised music scores.

this collection has hosted a plethora of community art events in Edinburgh, too – including a memorable poets’ and filmmakers’ speed-dating night, a huge multi-media showcase in the cavernous McEwan Hall, and an experimental ‘friendly’ poetry slam. Now, this collection is coming to Glasgow to seek out a whole new community, and to inspire new responses to the artistic works already produced under its umbrella.

The project will adopt The Glue Factory – an abandoned industrial space turned community arts venue – as its temporary home from 30th April to 15th May. Glasgow residents and visitors will be welcomed inside to peruse a wide and vibrant showcase of creative work inspired by the original this collection 100 poems.

We hope to see you there!

(Photo)

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this collection FRIENDLY POETRY SLAM: the fallout

Wednesday, April 6th, 2011

Cat Dean
Slam virgin Cat Dean wows the slam crowd at the Banshee Labyrinth.

I’ll admit – I was worried about how this event might go down. My aims for the slam were manifold. Firstly, I wanted to drag a few more “page” poets (i.e., poets who are normally more at home publishing in journals and books, and reading at traditional stand up readings) kicking and screaming into the performance scene – mainly to show them that hey, it’s really not that different or scary and look, there’s good poetry to be found here. Secondly, I wanted to get the message across to the performance crowd (although they do tend to be more receptive to stuff outside their own field of literary experience) that page poets can be fun, and that they can – sometimes, at least – perform. Mostly, I wanted to try and narrow the divide that – in spite of the best efforts of fabulous folk like Jenny Lindsay, who has been organising very open and approachable performance events for years – still stubbornly exists between page and stage in the Scottish poetry community.

As I say, this was by no means the first friendly slam that’s ever taken place. Indeed, I’m proud of the fact that Scotland seems to be at the forefront of new and innovative thinking when it comes to slamming and other performance poetry events. Over the past few years there have been one or two “sotto voce” or “quiet” slams about the place – the now-sadly-defunct VoxBox held a “quiet” slam specifically for page poets, and the Scottish Poetry Library also did a sotto slam in 2009, which yours truly here somehow managed to win. Working in this tradition, I wanted to further mess around with the traditional slam format, and by doing so, I hoped to chip away at some of the myths and misconceptions surrounding the phenomenon.

The main difference was in the scoring of the poems. I’m defiantly against the “traditional” slam scoring method, which involves the audience getting involved in rating each poet. In the US, where slams are always well-attended and often patronised by folk who are not either a) poets or b) friends of poets, I can see how this system could work… but in Scotland, where almost everyone in the crowd is a friend/enemy/editor/publisher/workshop buddy/love interest of at least one of the performers, it makes for skewed results. The poet with the most mates wins, to put it simply. The other traditional slam scoring option is the use of a judging panel. But this was a this collection event, and this collection is very much anti-hierarchy, anti-quality-control, anti-curation. To gather a panel of “esteemed judges” for the poets to impress was really not our style.

Instead, we decided to let the poets score each other. Each poet received a personalised score-card, which bore the names of all the poets performing, except for their own – so they could not award points for their own performance. Scores were out of 30 (10 for content, 10 for delivery, and 10 for that individual’s particular “overall opinion”), and recorded at the end of every poet’s performance. At the end of each round, all the scorecards were collected up and the scores anonymously tallied. Poets with high scores progressed through the ranks; poets with lower scores fell by the wayside – but everything was on a democratic, peer-review basis, and thanks to the wide variety of poets performing, we were confident that there would be little-to-no bias.

The scoring system did throw up some issues. Most obviously, it was a logistical nightmare. It wasn’t until I received the first batch of scores at the end of the first round that I realised: I was going to have to add up sixteen sets of scores out of 30 for sixteen poets within fifteen minutes. In round one alone, poets were competing for up to 580 points… that’s a hell of a lot of adding up. Fortunately, I had the help of two glamorous calculator-wielding assistants (my poor, long-suffering flatmates), and we managed, but if I were organising another event of this type, a more simplistic scoring method would have to be devised!

Secondly, several of the poets told me afterwards that they’d found the quick-fire nature of the scoring rather tricky. With only about 30 seconds or so between poets, they had to make snap decisions about the numbers they entered for each. Some said they appreciated this – it prevented them from getting bogged down in thinking and re-thinking their decision, and it meant that their responses were instinctive. Others said they found the whole thing rather stressful, and would have liked a bit more time to reflect on what they’d heard in order to give a score that they felt was reasoned and fair. Next time, I just need to spraff a bit more between performers, I think!

Finally, a couple of people said afterwards that they felt the poets-only scoring left the audience a feeling a little bit surplus-to-requirements. I was really pleased with the enthusiasm the audience were willing to give for each performance in spite of it being quite a long night, but I did note that things cooled off a little in the middle. I’m now thinking that perhaps a compromise of some scoring being done via audience reaction and some done by just the poets may be an interesting avenue to explore.

Otherwise, I was really pleased with the outcome of the scoring experiment, and really interested to see how poets reacted to other performances. Some folk were clearly being very harsh across the board, with some poets scoring certain performances with a big fat zero and never venturing into figures much higher than 6. Others seemed more than happy to dish out perfect 10s across the board to poets they really liked, and – my favourite part of the adding-up process – many of the scorecards came back with doodles, marginalia or explanatory notes decorating their margins. Overall, scoring was extremely close. Numerous folk have noted in their feedback about the evening that poets like Andrew Philip and Dave Coates deserved to move up to the second round, and I agree on both counts. However, it was literally the odd mark here and there that separated 10th place from 11th and 11th from 12th, etc. It was almost too close to call in some cases, and at one point my glamorous assistants and I actually did a re-count to ensure that the right person was getting the correct score. Poets who came lower than they would have liked – or perhaps lower than some of those in attendance felt they deserved – will hopefully be ever-so-slightly placated by the fact that it really was very close indeed.

The main discussion taking place in the aftermath of the slam – and may I take this opportunity to say how happy I am that so much healthy discussion has been generated by the event – concerns the old chestnut of performance vs page. Who had more of an advantage on the night? Who in attendance counts as ‘page’, and who counts as ‘stage’? Did one camp score the other unfairly – was there a bias for or against either side? And so on and so forth. Personally, while I am watching these discussions with interest, and chipping in every so often (of course), I’m kind of sad to hear these questions being raised. As I said above, my aim for the evening was to temporarily erase – or at least blur – the dividing line that exists between page and performance poets; to see the two sides of the poetry world come together and yes, compete… but also to listen to and acknowledge each other. And it felt like this happened on the night itself. In many cases it was difficult to ascertain who belonged to which camp – over at Tonguefire, commenters are scrabbling to define poets like Alec Beattie (whose set was decidedly performance-esque, but read from a book and something of a departure from his usual work), Colin McGuire (a poet who performs with great gusto but who normally shies away from performance-heavy gigs and whose stuff works brilliantly on the page too) and Emily Dodd (a poetry slam virgin… but one who embraces audience participation). I think it’s only later that the feeling of never-the-twain-shall-meet has begun to slink back in, which perhaps is inevitable. For me, the night itself did exactly what I wanted it to: it picked up the traditional make-your-own-slam kit and gave it a bit of a shake, and it got page-folk and stage-folk up to the same mic, and forced them to rate (or, indeed, slate) one another… all of which involved everyone listening carefully to everyone else. The array of talent on show was refreshingly varied and – if you ask me – of excellent quality, and everyone seemed to have a damn good night. It might take a few more of these things before folk really start thinking differently about how poetry is performed and received in Scotland, but for now, I’m really quite pleased.

Responses to the this collection slam:

“A great learning experience for us novices and some wonderful poems and performers.” – Alec Beattie

“It was a great success, with consistent quality and entertainment, from a controlled crowd of temporary human beings and poets…I think there may be more this collection SLAM nights to come. I hope so. Let there be mic!” – McGuire (more here

“I loved that Claire did something new with slams, and particularly that the ‘friendly’ tag encouraged folks to take part who usually wouldn’t touch slam with a barge pole. A couple o the scores raised my eyebrows - but that’s always the case with competitions isn’t it?” – Jenny Lindsay

“stand-out poems of the evening were Colin McGuire’s “Wrap the children in white”, Mairi Campbell-Jack’s “The Book of Antonyms” and Stephen Welsh‘s newspaper poem in the last round. Colin’s poem set me in mind of some of Neruda’s work, with its combination of surreal imagination, incantatory impetus and political edge. Mairi’s poem seemed to me to mark a significant and exciting step forward in her writing, and I was really impressed with how well she read. Stephen had cut up a Sunday Herald report of the weekend’s protests in London and blanked out certain portions, creating a beautiful, strange, quirky, lyrical, powerful poem — perhaps not so much found poetry as released.

Hearing those poems alone would have made it a worthwhile evening, but there were others. I particularly enjoyed “Scotland as an Xbox Game” by Andrew C Ferguson — just the sort of witty, imaginative examination of the hame nation that appeals to me. Dave Coates also read good work but unfortunately joined me in the junkyard after the first round; that’s just the risk you run at these things. And I liked the sci-fi poem that Russell Jones read in the second round.” – Andrew Philip (more here)

“I know what you were trying to do [at the slam] and there is movement in that direction we can see in the quiet slams that have been held. It’s fair enough and I really liked the poet judge thing.” – Tickle McNicoll

“The night was an enjoyable one, though, holding a friendly atmosphere and quick pace that kept things interesting. If you didn’t like a poet you only had to put up with them for 2.5 minutes, much like my love life.” – Russell Jones (more here

You can find photos of the event here.

Anyone else want to offer feedback? If so, link me to your thoughts or drop a line to claire@onenightstanzas.com. All comments welcomed!

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this collection zine-making workshop: the results

Thursday, March 17th, 2011

Anyone who’s been reading this blog for any amount of time will know that I am a huge fangirl of zines. From late 2007 to early 2010 I ran my own, Read This Magazine (currently in the process of being dismantled in order to make way for something new, by the way); I am a follower/subscriber of many other small independent literary zines (including The Letter Killeth — see work by Chris Lindores in their latest! — and Words Dance) and will always encourage others to follow my lead. About eighteen months ago I was gifted a huge stack of vintage music fanzines by local Edinburgh zinester and blogger, Nine. All of this somehow led to me leading a zine-making workshop at Tollcross Community Centre on behalf of this collection on Tuesday night.

I just want to say a huge thanks to everyone who came along — not least my sister and Lovely Boyfriend who didn’t have a great deal of choice in the matter. Thanks also to Sean Cartwright, Sue Steele, Julie Logan and Dave Forbes for your attendance and enthusiasm, and thanks of course to Stefanie Tan and everyone at TCC for the inspiration/organisation side of things.

Overall, the workshop was a massive success. I introduced six total zine virgins to a brand new artform, and we created seven beautiful Xeroxed and hand-bound creations to promote poetry, crafting, recycling and counter culture. It was such a success I might even run more! Give me a shout — poetry@thiscollection.org — if you’d be interested in such a thing. Some photos and a fab timelapse from the evening below…

Zinesters
Assembled zinesters: Steve, Dave, Sue, Julie, Sean, Stefa, Helen and myself.

Organ: Issue 42
Sean checks out some old 90s music fanzines for inspiration.

Zinesteristas
The cutting and sticking begins!

Steve's zine
Steve, aka Lovely Boyfriend, working on some (rather fabulous) blackout poems

My zine
My zine coming together — this collection needs you!

Dave's zine
Dave’s finished zine — complete with glitter!

Print media is dead: long live zines!

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this collection: poetry and film events for January

Wednesday, January 19th, 2011

Firstly we’d like to say a huge thank you to everyone who expressed an interest in running workshops with us or getting involved in this collection’s huge community project with ALP and Tollcross Community Centre. We’re happy to say that we’ve had some brilliant proposals and we’re now ready to unveil some of the events we’ll be running during our stay at the Centre. Coming up before the end of January…

FILM FACTORY: free all-day filmmaking workshops with Austin Muirhead
Friday 21st January
Monday 31st January
12:00 — 20:00 FREE! Booking required

Make films? Looking for a new film project? Always wanted to make films but never knew how? Come along to a FREE all-day film workshop, and learn the rules of film and how to break them. Hosted by Austin Muirhead, Canadian born technical director of The Gulf Islands Film and Television Film School.
Please bring yourself, your camera/cables (no fancy tech necessary), your laptop if you can, and make your own arrangements for lunch, etc.
Interested? Places are limited so please email film@thiscollection.org to reserve your spot!

FILM SCREENING & COMMUNITY ASSEMBLY
Wednesday 26th January
16:00 — 18:00 (screening), 18:00 — 20:00 (assembly)
FREE! and BYOB
A free showing of some of this collection’s amassed short films, followed by a free and open community assembly. Come and talk to us about Edinburgh’s artistic and creative community — what are you involved in? What would you like to see happening in the city? How can this collection help? Come and find out more about our project, pitch us your ideas, plug your event, show us your work, meet likeminded people and tell us about cool stuff we should know about. Very informal — all welcome. Bring friends, and BYOB.

POETRY WORKSHOPS: PAGE VS STAGE

POETRY FOR THE PAGE: OPEN WORKSHOP
Friday 28th January
16:00 — 17:30 FREE! Booking required

An open poetry workshop with Claire Askew, poet, Editor in Chief of Read This Magazine, Lecturer in Literature and Communications at Edinburgh’s Telford College and Tutor in Creative Writing at the University of Edinburgh. Bring up to three poems for discussion, contructive feedback, hints and tips from a small and friendly group. All welcome — no prior workshopping experience necessary!
Interested? Places are limited so please email poetry@thiscollection.org to reserve your spot!

POETRY FOR THE STAGE: WRITING OUT LOUD
Friday 28th January
18:00 — 20:00 FREE! Booking required

Stick around after Claire’s page workshop and find out how to adapt one of your poems for the stage. Alternatively, come along fresh and learn all about the finer points of performance. Hosted by Harry Giles, writer, theatre director, founder and co-ordinator of Inky Fingers and multiple-award-winning slam poet. All welcome, no experience necessary — just bring yourself, and a poem!
Interested? Places are limited so please email poetry@thiscollection.org to reserve your spot!

All events take place at: The Art Room, Tollcross Community Centre (next to Tollcross Primary School), Fountainbridge
Free tea and coffee will be provided at all events.

WANT TO RUN YOUR OWN EVENT?
We want to hear from anyone who wants to run their own workshop, host a meeting, screen films, exhibit art, put on a play, dance, sculpt or do anything else creative in our space. No proposal is too big, too small, or too strange. For more details visit http://bit.ly/dXqlS7 or email film@thiscollection.org

We hope to see some of you there!

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this collection & Tollcross Community Centre: call for pitches!

Wednesday, December 29th, 2010

Edinburgh's Barclay Kirk from a wet bus

this collection are teaming up with the fantastic Tollcross Community Centre and their Adult Learning Programme, and throughout Spring 2011, we’ll have access to the centre’s space and resources for three days of every working week. We’re hoping that we can fill this time with exciting collaborative opportunities, providing a space for artists of all walks of life to come together to create and discuss under the umbrella of this collection.

And that’s where YOU come in. We are throwing open the doors to allow access to anyone who’d like to join us in organizing an activity for local artists and/or writers. We’re looking for people to:

– host workshops in anything from creative writing to sculpture
– lead meetings, panels or discussions in the space
– host and co-ordinate events (remember our poet/filmmaker speed-dating?)
– give readings, performances or recitals in the space
– use the space for anything and anything artistic, collaborative and creative!

What’re the conditions? We don’t ask for much in return. Only…

– that your event MUST be inspired by or related to the this collection project
(e.g. you could give a masterclass on writing poems of 100 words or less, host a filmmaking workshop to adapt some of our poems, get together and discuss the concept of community collaboration, etc)

Interested? We’re looking for suggestions, proposals and pitches, and nothing is too small, too big, too weird or too ordinary. If there’s something you think you’d like to organise and you like the sound of a totally free space, get in touch!

Stuff to bear in mind:

– your event can be one-off, or one of a series. Let us know what you’re planning, and we’ll do our best to accomodate you.
– some materials/resources we may be able to provide; others you may have to bring yourself. Again, let us know.
– the space is available from 10am to 8.45pm every Monday, Wednesday and Friday. Want to use the whole day? No problem. Just want an hour or two? No problem. We can be flexible!
– the space is ours to use until at least the end of March, so if you’re busy for the next little while but still fancy doing something, fear not! We can fit you in!

Basically the message is, if you’re interested, GET IN TOUCH! We’d love to hear from you. We’re hoping to gather as many proposals as possible before the space is opened up to us, so if you’d like to be involved, drop us an informal line by 15th January and let us know what you’d like to do.

film@thiscollection.org
film@thiscollection.org
film@thiscollection.org

Get thinking, get emailing, and have a fantastic New Year!

PS: we will also be holding community meet-ups in the space on Friday nights, as of the middle of January — more on this soon! So if you want to talk to us about your thoughts for the project rather than emailing, drop us a line and we’ll let you know more!

PPS: A few T&Cs before we go…

this collection and the Tollcross Community Centre ask:
– that you take responsibility for the majority of the organisation and promotion of your event. this collection is anti-curatorial, which means we won’t do any of the tricky stuff for you, like making sure that people show up! We will, however, happily plug your event as widely as possible, put you in touch with helpful people if we know of any, and provide resources if we have them to hand.
– that, if you need to cancel your event for any reason, you let us and the venue know as soon as you possibly can, so we can try and give someone else your spot
– that you’ll credit any references to this collection in work that comes out of your time in the centre
– that you’ll allow the this collection crew to attend, promote, talk about and document your event if we want to
– that all work produced at your event is produced under creative commons (i.e. the artist retains the right to their work, but the work can be shown/referred to by this collection with their permission and with due credits)

(Photo by allybeag)

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Guest post by this collection: adapt our winter poems!

Thursday, December 16th, 2010


this collection is a non-profit collaborative arts project based in Edinburgh. It aims to bring artists from different walks of life together to work on projects inspired by the city. At present, this collection is focussing on an amalgamation of very short poems inspired by Edinburgh, and is working to find filmmakers of all ages and levels of experience to adapt these poems into short films. Find out more here.
As you’ll no doubt have noticed over the past few weeks, winter has now fully gripped Edinburgh, treating us to the heaviest snowfalls the city has seen for fifty years. Rumour has it there’s more of the white stuff on the way, and although this may seem like a good excuse to get your woolies on and stay indoors, this collection has a better idea. We have a whole flurry of winter poems in our collection of 100 that need adapting into films. We suggest you don an extra pair of socks, grab your camera and get out there and make us a short film. No prior experience or fancy tech necessary!
Here are some of our lovely winter verses that need adaptating!
The Piteous Pine by Florian Raith
“So cold despite the solid coat; clenched tightly,
The right fist in the pocket and partly regretful
Not to gorge on the sordid warmth: brightly lit
The stifling, horrid feast promises forgetfulness…”
January by Hayley Shields
A murmur rippling through
the silver edged blades
of grass, as they bathe
in muddled starlight…”
Cables by Kate Charles
“Edinburgh cuts a high moon
Hunkered figures, hands expectant, ask
For reasoning, dulled or blank to your rising rage,
some long gone time come close…”
The Windy City by Kat Maher
“Meadows of ice, deceptive sunlight
So inviting from windows, a kaleidoscope of lies…”
Waking up with Edinburgh by Helle Hang
“Grumpy as always,
Dear as always.
Frost over the Meadows,
Smoke from neighbour’s chimney…”
A Recipe for Whisky by Ron Butlin
“Wring the Scottish rain clouds dry;
take sleet, the driving snow, the hail;
winter twilight…”
A Winter Walk Along Lauriston Place by Laura Barbier
“The street swims by beneath,
Siberia groans aloud in my ears
Shifting the last of the leaves
Into freefall…”
Need some inspiration? Check out Helen Askew’s adaptation of Struan Robertson’s snowy poem, “Where it lies” — first showcased by this collection at the McEwan Hall!
Want to make a film for us? Email film[@]thiscollection.org or check out our Submissions page for more info.

this collection poetry/film showcase: the write-up!

Wednesday, March 31st, 2010

this collection day one

So unless this is your first visit to this blog, you’ll know that last Thursday marked the first half of my side-project this collection’s two-day March film and poetry showcase at Edinburgh’s magnificent McEwan Hall

…and what a first day it was! We flung open the doors at 10am and greeted the good people of Edinburgh as they came in to escape the swirling haar. Our DIY flags, posters and flyers drew a crowd made up of all sorts of people — some told us they’d had the date marked in their diary for weeks, while others just wandered in for a look and seemed to like what they saw! The film screenings were spread across four screens within the main hall space, with each screen housing around five or six films. These were subtly grouped by theme — warm, cold, stop-motion, palimpsest — and accompanied by their respective poems either on-screen or in DIY pamphlets for viewers to pick up and read. Sound engineer Simon Herron provided a spectacular non-stop city soundscape which played throughout the hall, and Glasgow-based experimental orchestra CRA:CC provided an improvised musical soundtrack in response to the films as they played out. Visitors were also able to congregate around our free press merchandise table: a source of books, pamphlets, magazines, journals, promotional materials and all manner of other poetry- and film-related paraphernalia, all of it completely free!

Through the afternoon we saw a steady stream of visitors, all of whom responded positively to the installation and the project as a whole. Documenting their reactions to the films was almost as enjoyable as the films themselves — watch this space for photos, video and stop-motion footage of the event in due course! We were particularly happy to see people who’d never heard of this collection, but who left raving about it and asking how they could come on board and get involved!

this collection McEwan Hall showcase

The next day, following the success of Thursday, expectations were high for our poetry-film finale on Friday 26th…

The evening kicked off at 6.30pm when we flung open the doors of the McEwan Hall, and were delighted to find an already-sizeable gaggle of keen poets, filmmakers and enthusiasts waiting on the doorstep. We quickly uncorked the first of many bottles of free wine and sat back to watch the influx of visitors. Once the crowd had gathered, I kicked off with a speech welcoming everyone to the event, giving a potted history of this collection and explaining what the evening had in store. Stefa then gave a brief round of thanks to all the wonderful people who’d helped make the event happen, and then without further ado, the party got under way!

The first four poets to read were Dan Mussett (a late addition, stepping in to replace Morgan Downie who sadly couldn’t be with us), Russell Jones, Anita John and McGuire. Russell was spotted brandishing copies of his pamphlet, The Last Refuge (Forest Publications), which would suggest his reading went down very well with those who gravitated towards Poet Station #1. At Station #2 Dan Mussett gave a beautiful reading in spite of his late addition to the bill, and Anita John gathered a sizeable audience in the upper gallery at Station #4. Meanwhile at gallery Station #3 McGuire was a total triumph — even gathering a crowd in the main hall below! These four poets were followed by Tom Bristow, Juliet Wilson, Simon Jackson and Andrew C Ferguson respectively — Juliet brought along copies of her hot-off-the-press pamphlet ‘Unthinkable Skies’ (Calder Wood Press) and read a particularly lovely poem about a sycamore tree, among others. Simon Jackson was multi-tasking, as two of his films were also showing in the hall below, and Andrew and Tom both received rapturous rounds of applause from their respective audiences.
The third sets were provided by Rob A Mackenzie, my good self (standing in for Aileen Ballantyne who also sadly couldn’t make it in the end), Christine de Luca and Chris Lindores. Rob and Christine both read excellently and Chris Lindores was a tour de force, gathering the largest crowd of the evening — and the most glowing feedback! — and shifting a fair few copies of his pamphlet, You Old Soak (Read This Press) over the course of the evening! The poetry was wrapped up by Andrew Philip, who read from his critically-acclaimed book The Ambulance Box (Salt); Jane McKie, whose film adaptation of La Plage (courtesy of Alastair Cook of DISSIMILAR) played in the background as she read; Hayley Shields, who entranced a small but attentive audience with her ghostly tales and accounts of Edinburgh’s darker side; and Mairi Sharratt, whose audience were asked to pick her set themselves, by shouting a series of numbers which each corresponded to a poem.

this collection McEwan Hall showcase

All the poetry readings were accompanied by a continuous stream of beautiful, dark, inspiring and moving images courtesy of our many talented filmmakers. Adaptations by Helen Askew, Sean Gallen, Abhinaya Muralidharan, Alastair Cook, Ginnetta Correli, Diana Lindbjerg Jorgense, Dominique De Groen, Hans Peter, Heather Bowry, James Mildred and Francesca Sobanje, Laura Witz, Lewis Bennett, Rawan Mohammed, Rose Creasy, Simon Jackson, Stefanie Tan and ThatCollective all graced our projector screens as the evening progressed. Although some of the films included audio (piped through headphones at each station), the McEwan Hall had its own soundtrack for the evening. This took the form of a mercurial city soundscape, put together by the super-talented Simon Herron of ThatCollective; as well as improvised music and ethereal sounds from the CRA:CC experimental ensemble.

this collection McEwan Hall showcase

The evening rounded up just before 9pm, but the festivities continued well into the night at various alternative venues around the city! Altogether, the this collection team worked out that over 200 people had come along to be a part of our showcase, and so far we’ve received glowing feedback from poets, filmmakers, musicians and visitors alike. Thanks so much to everyone who came along, everyone who helped us organise, set up, take down, fund, promote or otherwise realise the event, and of course to all the brilliant artists who lent their creativity to us for the evening!

Here’s to the next…
Love,
Claire and Stefa

this collection showcase photos by Tom Bishop and Marzieh Jarrahi.

Don’t forget to visit The Read This Store, and its sister store, Edinburgh Vintage!

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Procrastination Station #64

Friday, March 19th, 2010

It’s been ages since I last did a PS post… sorry!

What kind of Moleskine-er are you?

Poster poems: dates

How to use an apostrophe.

Extreme font dork moment.

A recent ‘poem of the week’ you may recognise…

Poetry and relentless careerism.

Antique typewriters galore! … and more! (thanks Paul!)

Anatomical Bifurcation of Scottish Poetry (thanks, @JFDerry!)

Test your vocabulary!

Seven adventures in performance poetry…

Yes, I am the last person in the world to discover 365ampersands. Whatever. It’s oddly addictive.

What have ONS’s readers and friends been up to lately, I hear you cry? Well… the utterly brilliant Ryan Van Winkle won the Crashaw Prize! HUGE congrats, Ryan! // Rachel gave McGuire a mention // Mairi talked about collaboration // Jennifer of Flights of Fancy gave us a sweet shout-out! // I was interviewed by Amy Blakemore for YM // Gareth Trew appeared at Bolts of Silk // and Tom Allan, Juliet Wilson and Andy Philip all gave this collection a mention!

How to fight crime by making your bed.

Richard J Evans at Chainsaws and Jelly

I love the artworks of Sophie Blackall

Amazing Alice in Wonderland tattoo!

Octopus pun, anyone?

I love Conniving and Sinister (from Shakesville)

I also love the Young Me Now Me project

Best Google streetmap shot ever! (thanks Kona!)

& finally…


Octopus: my sister’s latest short film


I am George Watsky’s BIGGEST FANGIRL. Can’t stop listening to this track. Buy his album!


I could listen to Bonnie speak all day.


*snicker*

(Image by eklektick)

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this collection update: the Top 100 Poems are here!

Thursday, March 5th, 2009

So, presumably you all remember my this collection project? Our original idea was to collect 100 poems, each of 100 words or less, from Edinburgh poets of all ages and abilities… then to pass them on to a group of budding young filmmakers, to create a visual/poetic fusion and capture 100 tinty snapshots of life in our beautiful city!

Well, we received hundreds and hundreds of poetry submissions — lots more than we expected, and some really great poets came forward to offer up their works. It’s taken us ages to sort out the ones we really wanted, but finally, it’s done. The Top 100 Poems are here!

No. 1: Betwixt by Elaine Webster
No. 2: Lonely City by Jim Murdoch
No. 3: Mellis, Victoria Street by Vivien Jones
No. 4: To Edinburgh by Russell Jones
No. 5: Crags by Dave Coates
No. 6: Stopping by Stefanie Tan
No. 7: MacAdam’s Inventory O A Tourist Trap by Andrew Philip
No. 8: And Nothing Worth Remembering by Florian Raith
No. 9: The Piteous Pine by Florian Raith
No. 10: The Forgotten Orchard of Craiglockhart by Jonathan Memel
No. 11: The Guid Room by Angela Blacklock-Brown
No. 12: Tollcross by Dilys Rose
No. 13: Tarvit Street, 2am by Dilys Rose
No. 14: Edinburgh Summer by Norman Bissett
No. 15: The Fringe by Miha Pintaric
No. 16: Going Home by Aiko Harman
No. 17: Between Lauriston Gardens and Lauriston Park by Aiko Harman
No. 18: Union Canal by Vicki Allardice
No. 19: Cafe Life Slice by Jean Atkin
No. 20: At Greyfriars Bobby’s Pub by Ken Pobo
No. 21: It by Brian McCabe
No. 22: Buddha by Brian McCabe
No. 23: Great Junkie Street Aye by JL Williams
No. 24: Edinburgh Haiku by Alan Gay
No. 25: First Aid in the Botanic Gardens by Alan Gay
No. 26: Niddrie by Claire Askew
No. 27: The Number 31 bus taken from Lasswade by Nicholas Goodrick
No. 28: Animal Haven by Juliet M Wilson
No. 29: The Business of Ravens by Roxanne Paris
No. 30: The Septuagenarian and the Quartermile by Roxanne Paris
No. 31: Corstorphine, Midnight by Rob A Mackenzie
No. 32: Lady Edinburgh by Tatjana Pfennig
No. 33: Rebels of this timeless town by Niki Ανδρικοπούλου
No. 34: View over Nicolson Street by Benjamin Dahlbeck
No. 35: Portobello by Morgan Downie
No. 36: Scene by Morgan Downie
No. 37: Anonymous by Dan Mussett
No. 38: From Saturday to Monday by Jason Monios
No. 39: Happy Birthday Hole by Jason Monios
No. 40: Morningside by Andrew C Fergusson
No. 41: Newington, EH9 by Andrew C Fergusson
No. 42: Gallows-birds and Graveyards by Hayley Shields
No. 43: January by Hayley Shields
No. 44: Southside II & III by Lauren Pope
No. 45: Perfume by Magnus Huntly-Grant
No. 46: His Side O The Story (Forthview Primary) by Simon Jackson
No. 47: Landlocked in the Port of Leith by Simon Jackson
No. 48: Postcode by Becca Hotchen
No. 49: An Edinburgh Invitation by Sue Armstrong
No. 50: Festive, All by Greg Whelan
No. 51: After the last tattoo by Christie Williamson
No. 52: Calton Hill by Antonia Leslie
No. 53: Ardmillan Lullaby by Mary Grundy
No. 54: 33 by Jonny Stockford
No. 55: Newington Road by Jonny Stockford
No. 56: Currie by Dorothy Baird
No. 57: Broken by Robyn Archer
No. 58: Transformation by Christine de Luca
No. 59: Edinburgh Volte-Face by Christine de Luca
No. 60: Telepathy by Tom Bristow
No. 61: Ministry of Memory by Tom Bristow
No. 62: Dùn Éideanns by Martin Mac an t-Saoir
No. 63: Imlach by Andrew Greig
No. 64: Scotland by Andrew Greig
No. 65: The Hanging Stanes by Sam Meekings
No. 66: To The Man Sleeping on Nicolson Square by Ellie Blow
No. 67: Conspiracy of Buses by Jane McKie
No. 68: La Plage by Jane McKie
No. 69: Broughton Street by Jess Winch
No. 70: The Castle by Mairi Sharratt
No. 71: Lunchtime in Leith by Martin Raymond
No. 72: How does a bookies have a sale anyway? by Chris Lindores
No. 73: The Pubic Triangle by Chris Lindores
No. 74: Walls by Fiona Morrison
No. 75: Where it lies by Struan Robertson
No. 76: The River At Cramond by Aileen Ballantyne
No. 77: John Knox’s Grave by Aileen Ballantyne
No. 78: Cables by Kate Charles
No. 79: Mary King’s Close by Aileen Lobban
No. 80: Edin Unfurling by Gemma White
No. 81: The Windy City by Kat Maher
No. 82: Tradesmen Visit by Finlay Gall
No. 83: Waking up with Edinburgh by Helle Häng
No. 84: Jawbone Walk by Julia Sanchez
No. 85: Circus Lane by Ivan Landers
No. 86: Sweet Sandy by McGuire
No. 87: Scarlet by Roddy Lumsden
No. 88: On an Old Scots Dictionary by Robby Lumsden
No. 89: The Summer of EH26 by Anita John
No. 90: After the Festival by Anita John
No. 91: A Recipe for Whisky by Ron Butlin
No. 92: A Lifetime by Ron Butlin
No. 93: A Winter Walk Along Lauriston Place by Lara Barbier
No. 94: Aig Dachaidh/At Home by Aonghas Macneacail
No. 95: Dead Plastic Crow by Aonghas Macneacail
No. 96: Princes Street by Alan Gillis
No. 97: Class by Irene Brown
No. 98: Same place, different view by Anna Dickie
No. 99: Overflow by Priscilla Chueng-Nainby
No. 100: Detained by Struan Robertson

That’s your weekend reading sorted!

(Photo by Mellowmark)

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